Thursday, December 10, 2015

Free Children's Audiobooks for HONDA DRIVERS

If you own a HONDA, you can register your VIN number and download free audiobooks for your kids. Click on Downpour ad to right to see how it works. Since its birth as a motorcycle company in 1949, Honda has steadily grown into the world’s fifth largest automaker and top engine manufacturer, as well as one of the most beloved, most profitable, and most consistently innovative multinational corporations. What drives the company that keeps creating and improving award-winning and bestselling models like the Civic, Accord, Odyssey, CR-V, and Pilot?
According to award-winning journalist Jeffrey Rothfeder, what truly distinguishes Honda from its competitors, especially archrival Toyota, is a deep commitment to a set of unorthodox management tenets. The Honda Way, as insiders call it, is notable for decentralization over corporate control, simplicity over complexity, experimentation over Six Sigma–driven efficiency, and unyielding cynicism toward the status quo and whatever is assumed to be the truth. Honda believes in freely borrowing from the past as a bridge to “innovative discontinuity” in the present. And those are just a few of the ideas that the company’s colorful founder, Soichiro Honda, embedded in the DNA of his start-up sixty-five years ago. Rothfeder digs deep into Honda’s culture, management, and global strategy to find what makes the company tick. He offers a behind-the-scenes look at its revolutionary factory in Lincoln, Alabama, a paradigm of Honda’s unique flexible manufacturing system. At Lincoln, several different types of cars can be produced on a single assembly line any given hour, and the compact plant manufactures up to 300,000 vehicles and engines a year, making it one of the world’s most productive. Drawing on access to dozens of high-level Honda executives, Rothfeder identifies the three core principles that every Honda employee shares, and shows how the company’s flexible manufacturing model, unique supply chain management techniques, and unorthodox (and contentious) daily brainstorming meetings are just a few keys to its success. In DRIVING HONDA Rothfeder makes a convincing case that Honda should serve as the model for a manufacturing rebirth in America.

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